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BUCK'S BASE CAMP

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RESEARCH - RESEARCH & MORE RESEARCH

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 3

 

After a few back operations my list of my camp wares has been cut down and kept cleaned, packed - ready for whatever. Funny thing is I haven't missed any of the older "kit", the down sizing really helps with moving around and keeping track of your wares. Plus the funds raised from selling the old setup didn't hurt either. Combined weight is now at 27.8 lbs. counting gun. Not bad at all, I'll keep working for a lighter "kit". A few items have been carried over from the previous page, those that didn't make the switch have been sold.

By cutting down, going lighter I have accomplished several other things which have added to my enjoyment. I have shortened my time in preparation and clean up. I have less general discomfort around camp or on the trail, plus my over-all confidence has improved.

"Less is better" Thomas Payne 1761

 

COAT - SHIRTS

 

CAP - LEGGINGS - SCARF - SOCKS

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Shown are items of hand-sewn, hand-woven cotton, wool and brain tan in correct colors, prints and patterns of the 1730-1760 periods for a working man wears. The shirt patterns were copied from original seen at the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, National Park Service, St. Louis, Missouri.

Another wonderful shirt is the John McClure’s work shirt, dated 1760 found at Harrisburg Museum, Harrisburg Pennsylvania.

A David Thompson quote from March 25, 1810, at Saleesh House : "...we now plainly, as well as the [Salish] Indians, see in this climate, the great advantage of woolen over leather clothing, the latter when wet sticks to the skin, and is very uncomfortable, requires time to dry, with caution to keep it to it's shape of clothing. On the contrary the woolen, even when wet, is not uncomfortable, is readily dried and keeps it's shape, which quality they admire."

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The Indians fully appreciated the use of cotton and woolen clothing, especially waist coats, caps, long socks and were glad to trade and change their leather dress for ones of the cotton - woolen manufacture of England. From his Narrative, Glover edition, p. 304.

See: . Common Shirt

In the book: Peyser, J. L., editor "Jacques Legardeur De Saint-Pierre, Officer, Gentleman, Entrepreneur", Michigan State Museum - there are translations of numerous Montreal merchant's, lists starting around 1730's with extensive listing of cloth/leather and wool destined for the trade. A review of these inventories might be helpful in one's search for the use of these items for scarf's, shirts and socks.

A brain tanned buckskin coat with fusian fabric lining is light and has provided good service.

 

BLANKETS - BEDROLL

 

CARRIED WITH THE BEDROLL

Blankets

BLANKETS

Hudson's Bay Co., Witney or homespun blankets were very common.

See: . Blankets

Bedroll

Bedroll

 

BEDROLL

 

A common method of carrying ones clothing and extras was in the bedroll.

 

What one would expect to find in a bedroll.

(1) Wool blanket.

(1) Shirt

(2) Pair of socks

(1) Canvas cover.

(1) Canvas Bag with misc. small items.

(1) Ground cloth.

(1) Hand made rope.

Wool blankets have been carried from the late 1600s into this century by military and civilians alike. Hudson's Bay Co., Witney or homespun blankets were and are very common when doing your research.

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At the beginning of the French & Indian War, every volunteer and regular had, or tried to acquire, a knapsack. One of the casualties, particularly among the citizen soldiers in the militia, was the knapsack. To take its place, there was the bedroll.

For our purposes, the bedroll should consist of one blanket, rolled lengthwise. The ends are tied together with string from the trumpline creating a "hoop". The use of a third lace near the middle will help hold the roll together while being worn over the shoulder. There is also the variant method of leaving a length of cord between the ends of the roll, to allow more freedom of movement. You can roll your oil cloth ground cover up with the blanket. Personal items may have been, and most likely are tucked away in the bedroll. * Food was not carried in the bedroll. Most soldiers carried a forage bag, popularly called the haversack. Remember to consider the more one carries inside the bedroll, the bigger the bedroll becomes. Bigger is not better when one is trying to keep his place in line and shoulder or fire a musket. The desire to keep the diameter of the bedroll as small as possible becomes more obvious when these factors are considered. The purpose of the haversack is to carry one’s rations about until eaten. Also, the cup could be attached to the belt, as suggested in some militia drill manuals, or to the strap of the haversack. But one could do this with one’s bedroll, if one wanted.

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TRUMPLINE

 

 

 

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SNAPSACK

 

 

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BRAIN TANNED MITTENS

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WOOL MITTENS

TRUMPLINE

Known generally as a tumpline in the modern circles, until the 18th Century, it was called in various journals a topline, taumpline, tumpline and burden strap along with several Native names. The basic design of these tumplines was given by Joseph-Charles Bonin dit Jolicoeur in his journals of 1751 to 1760. They were described as roughly 15 feet overall with a wide strap (a brow strap) that was approximately 4 inches wide by 16 inches in length. Pierre Pouchot in his memoirs mentions the Indians carrying both large and small bundles with this type of strap. Militia men and Provincial soldiers of the 1740s and 1750s carried their bedrolls using tumplines, no doubt adapting it from the Natives.

During the French and Indian War (Seven Years War), Thomas Gage directed his light infantry to carry their bedrolls "Indian style, using a tumpline."

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SNAPSACK

This is my 'snapsack' mentioned earlier filled with the above listed items. Probably one of the better ways found to carry my equipage. It usually weights approximately 12-15 lbs.

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MITTENS

I love these mittens made of brain tan mule deer and hand sewn with the sinew from the same animal. In real cold weather a pair of hand knit wool mitten fit inside these mittens for a double layer of protection from the cold.

 

DAY BAG - HAVERSACK

 

HAVERSACK (CONTENTS)

Day Bag

DAY BAG

Haversack

DAY BAG (inside)

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DAY BAG (contents)

Haversack

HAVERSACK

Haversack

HAVERSACK (contents)

 

Shown are some of my camp wares duplicated from items seen at the 'Museum of Man' in Canada, 'Museum of the Fur Trade' in NE and dozens of museums and private collections through out North America.

This is a very nice "day bag" made from hemp, bark tan leather and lined with pillow ticking. Beautiful workmanship by a friend, Bob Browder of "Longhunter Leather Company". Bob made a matching "hunting pouch" that is as good as it gets, again great craftsmanship.

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HUNTING & DAY BAGS

 

I carry a number of small items in this bag for easy access. I keep both the "day bag" and the "hunting pouch" with me at all times.

Origin English for everything shown: * period sunglasses/reading glasses with period case. * 1700s wooden cased compass with fabric bag. * Writing pad with ivory leaves & lead pencil with greased brain tan bag. * HBC striker with flint chips carried in brain tan and cloth bags. Origin English for everything shown: Tin w/ Black Japanned Enamel finish.

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A neat little spice box for a little cayenne, sea salt or nutmeg to improve the flavor. This little brass box opens at both ends, giving two separate compartments. A correct pocket grater, original in family collection. Dated: 1735. Origin: English.

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HAVERSACK (contents)

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HAVERSACK (contents)

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THROWING SLING

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BELT POUCH (contents)

Haversack

CAMP LIGHT

Contents in haversack: * extra swan shot, ball. * pre-measured shot in paper rolls. * a brass tube with tou. * grease mixed with beeswax. * a small bottle of solvent. * a small tin container filled with buffalo lard is used for grease when cooking or to lube leather or metal (again a duel purpose item). Brain tan mule deer greased with buffalo tallow to help protect the box. * GBW "Gentleman's Folding Handle Cup" works for boiling food or drinking (compact). * brass "house wife" sewing kit. * (2) brass blanket pins.* leather wangs. * food ration bags in several different sizes, hand sewed - correct early period item. Brown paper is also used for dried food and greased cooked meat. * wooden spoon. * spice box. * toiletry kit, bone handle tool brush, tin with baking powder (tooth paste), tin with "soap on a rope" (beats dropping in the water when washing). * turkey bone turkey call. * butt wipes from cotton material scraps. * forged iron cooking fork and a "martin" pick with leather cover. * antique 'King James Bible' - Origin: 18th Century England - that has been carried since the 70's. The small print can be a problem when only using a candle for reading. * tea spoon, old silver plated spoon, brick of tea and cloth carrying bags. * leather "throwing sling" to run game animals when hunting.

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I made this candle holder while on a 7 day canoe/camping trek on the Upper Missouri River back in the early 80's. Found an old handmade nail and put it to good use.

 

CAMP WARES

 

WEAPONS

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Haversack

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Shown is my complete camp wares set duplicated from items seen at the 'Museum of Man' in Canada, 'Museum of the Fur Trade' in NE and dozens of museums and private collections through out North America. For over forty years I have carried my small silver plated cup with a small wooden barrel on a thong to attach to my belt.

I carry an original magnifying glass form the American Revolutionary War for starting fires, burning a hole in something soft or just for "kicks". Its 3/4" square and fold into a 1/2" flat devise carried in by belt pouch. Along with the glass I also carried a small tin box with medicine, a small beaded bag with a 'button helper' (used as an aid with hard to button items). Neumann's Encyclopedia Dated: 1730 Origin: Canada/French.

Closer view of my sunglasses & reading glasses. Origin: 18th Century England/France.

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I always carried a flint wallet like seen in Neumann's Encyclopedia references to early military units. * (6) English rifle flints. * nipple pick and pan brush. * combination tool (screw drivers, pick and flint knapper. * forge needle.

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Have always used a 'cow's knee' like seen in references to early frontiersmen through-out history. I keep the longer tie secured to the trigger guard to prevent loosing when removed and taking a fast shot at game or whatever.

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PERIOD TRAVEL

   

Equipage

Saddle & Tradegun

Saddle & Tradegun

Shown is my complete horse camp set duplicated from items seen at the 'Museum of Man' in Canada and the 'Museum of the Fur Trade' in NE.

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Here my Santa Fe saddle with an early Wilson trade gun.

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A nice way to cover a given distance is by water, no problems with crossing unknown ground, feed issues, fences, wild animals and wilder property owners. Moving across state lines with health department requirements, etc. Only real issues found have been water conditions, damns and once in a while a farmer's fence that can be ducked under.

Canoe

canoe

canoe

I have used several styles of water vessels in the past; flat boats, keelboats, barges, dug-outs, birch-bark to modern canoes.

canoe

canoe

Keelboats on the Upper Missouri is as good

 

 

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Updated 02-20-2013